W19 - Being obvious is boring/the pink fur is your tough cookie

We've been in a conversation with service design for at least one month but yet it's still hard to explain what's service design. Then I decided to go back to the manual book <This is service design thinking>

  1. It is user-centered : agree on a common language!
  2. It is co-creative: Everyone can be creative! (bring together end users, service providers and stakeholders)
  3. It is sequencing: Imagine a service as a movie!
  4. It is evidencing: Make the intangible tangible!
  5. It is holistic: Keep the big picture!

AT-ONE: Becoming at-one with your customers 

  • A is for Actors, collaborating in value networks. New combinations of Actors who together provide the service.
  • T: Making touch points work as a whole. Coordination and development of touch points between customer and service.
  • O: The service offering is the brand. The design of what the service is actually offering.
  • N: How do you know what customers want, need and desire? The needs that the service satisfies.
  • E: Experiences that surprise and delight. The experience that the service gives the customer.

Besides the author gives a model of engagement map in an advanced chapter later on to understand users motivation, for the future implementation of service design in a broader scale such as politics, education and creation.

Motivation psychology 

An organismic world view posits that individuals are naturally predetermined (intrinsically motivated) to, overtime, seek new sensory experiences, develop and refine skills and seek increased personal challenges as part of their acquisition of an ever broader comprehension of our world around us.

Research synthesis

We decided to go back to our research and seek for groundings for our ideation, experimented service design tools. From tutoring session we learned that

  • Service design has parallel activities in the process. They’re all the characteristics of your service, whether it’s a stakeholder map, journey map, insights, etc.
  • Start with a conceptual level, think of the experience like a movie, the motivation and the feeling. Afterwards dive deep in touch points.
  • Where is the beginning of the service? Where is the end? Consider service as a sequence
  • Think of the variations of service. How can them be implemented into different types of touch point.
  • Summarise the features of what interest people? What’s the essence or keywords? What enhances the experience?
  • Think of the level of knowledge, motivation, curiosity in the dialogue. And dialogue with yourself, a reflection.

From story to insights

Three kittens synthesising stories

Three kittens synthesising stories

Use statement, hypothesis and patterns to translate stories to insights

Use statement, hypothesis and patterns to translate stories to insights

Role play of journey map

Role play of the user's journey map

Role play of the user's journey map

Mapping out quotes and pain points

Mapping out quotes and pain points

Stakeholder map

Stakeholders map from perspective of tourists: level of interaction

Stakeholders map from perspective of tourists: level of interaction

Stakeholders map from perspective of researchers: level of interaction

Stakeholders map from perspective of researchers: level of interaction

Ideation day

Scan of the sketches

Mars in planetarium Umevatoriet

Galaxy particles in planetarium Umevatoriet

Mars robot in Umevatoriet

Dragon breathing out fire in Umevatoriet

Kids lab cloth

Kids lab cloth

How much do you weight on Earth, Moon, Mars and Sun?

How much do you weight on Earth, Moon, Mars and Sun?

Interview with Bastian and visiting Umevatoriet

We went to the local observatory to meet Bastian as an science outreach case study. The work he's been dong there was fascinated as in it evokes your memory when you were a child. 

  • “I use different technics when talking to people in different age spans. For instance, elderly people are easy fascinated by philosophical aspects of science. An example could be “where do I come from?” Once I made a piechart of the elements in human body and compared it to a piechart of the elements of universe long time ago. Another example could be “why can you see?” Some children think their eyes are beaming lights. They don’t see eyes as receptors of lights. And “where does time go?” This is especially interesting for elder people because they have experienced the flow of time.”
  • “I don’t explain with equations. Zero equation! I use stories and phenomenon.”
  • “Small kids from 5 to 8 are curious as well. Everything they see is cool. But they cannot focus for a long time. You cannot give them a lecture for more than 20 minutes.”
  • “Sometimes people ask questions that are difficult to answer. For instance “Is the universe infinite?” Infinite is complicated and you cannot explain it without stepping in to the field of quantum physics. I try to skip details. If I have to describe what is a black hole, I will say “it’s a really small and heavy object and nothing can go out of it once it’s trapped inside.” And I’m not lying if I say that. But if I’m have to explain in an over simplified way, I will say that this is an simplified version just to make it understandable.”
  • “People ask “Have you seen god?” but it’s really rare. It’s silly but it’s a good opportunity to explain what’s science. Religion seek for truth but science is removing what’s wrong.
  • “As a tour guide, I can adapt to the level of knowledge people have. In a group tour guide, the majority of people are in the middle comfort zone and it’s good to push them a little bit to think. There are people feeling completely lost and confused as well. That’s why we need an adaptive tour guide. I’m freestyle. Every time I come up with something new and different. I don’t really prepare for anything because it’s gonna be boring for me as well.”

I still remember how I was fascinated by astronomy, dinosaurs, marine biology and etc. when I was a child. Because most of our kind never seen and experienced these legendary stories and this adds to the awe moment. It's real but it's little bit out of our daily mindset. It needs some level of abstract thinking. You can ask all kinds of silly questions when you were a child but then you are so afraid of being stupid in front of smart people and this makes you shut up. 

This exactly shows our problem for science outreach